Are Boats That Use WOOD bad? - Boating Forum

Mobile Top Ad Widget

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Are Boats That Use WOOD bad?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Are Boats That Use WOOD bad?

    I want a open bow runabout. I like caravelle and glastron since they are 100% wood free. Stingray uses a little pressure treated, bayliner uses tons of wood, tahoe, reinell all use wood. does it rot in say 10-20years or is it not a concern\?

  • #2
    wood stringers, balsa core decks, plywood floors with carpet glued on to wick in moisture and keep the wood damp...

    Boat builders have been making cheap boats for decades that were designed to rot and die....

    However, smart boat owners have been keeping raintight covers on them and outsmarting the boat builders.

    My 1992 Bayliner and my 1969 Grew both have the original plywood floor and original carpet.
    The Grew has a balsa core deck that I (200 lbs) dive off of regularly. It's rock solid at age 40.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	post475.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	89.6 KB
ID:	3381

    Most rotten boats are rotten because they were improperly stored. I see nice boats sitting in driveways with tarps all full of water, no covers, bow down, all sorts of mistreatment. No wonder they rot.
    $20000 boats with $20 poly tarps..
    I don't understand people's economics...
    A nice $500 custom cover makes a big difference....scotchgaurd it each spring.

    A 20 or 30 year old boat that was boathouse kept or stored in a rack will be mint.
    Mine spends the winter under a $200 portable garage from Costco. Never been shrink wrapped, just keep the snow and rain off as much as possible.
    I suspect a proper shrink wrap job with ventilation designed in is very effective.
    If no ventilation, I have heard of moisture issues over the winter damaging boats.

    I'm sure wood-free eliminates some rot issues- but wood is super-strong for it's weight. I wonder what gives these wood free boats their rigidity.

    My Grew has mahogany stringers. I don't know what is in my Bayliner. both boats are mint. I launch them off of large waves routinely so whatever is in the Bayliner is plenty strong.
    Last edited by Howard Sterndrive; 09-14-2009, 06:08 PM.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Howard Sterndrive View Post
      Mine spends the winter under a $200 portable garage from Costco. Never been shrink wrapped, just keep the snow and rain off as much as possible.
      Very nice shape.
      I know couple people that winterize their boat then put them in their Costco/Canadian Tire portables and when spring time comes around it looks like they just put it in.

      Comment


      • #4
        This topic scares me...

        One things for sure...I love my portable shelter!

        Comment


        • #5
          Wooden boats are high-maintenance, requiring regular caulking and work

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Aceline View Post
            Wooden boats are high-maintenance, requiring regular caulking and work

            Yes, I agree that wooden boats are high maint. However, there are few wooden boat owners (like myself) that have chosen to accept the work as part of their boating experience. Constant cleaning, bilge inspections and re-varnishing are all part of the mystique. Even careful operation of the vessel has an effect on the boat's longetivity. There is one thing that cannot be denied, however: The beauty and efficiency of wood, whether in a "one-of" or a production model, is a reminder of our boating past and a salute to the future of boating in general.

            Comment

            Mobile Bottom Ad Widget

            Collapse
            Working...
            X